UK’s Independent Highlights Company’s “Quality, Privacy, Security”

Khaled Kteily, Founder and Chief Executive Officer of Legacy, and a graduate of Harvard University’s Public Policy program, was quoted by the newspaper as saying, “For a lot of the world, Switzerland has an association with quality. Think of Swiss banks, Swiss watches and even chocolate. We have a strong emphasis on quality, privacy and security.”

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Legacy Wins TechCrunch Disrupt Berlin 2018

Legacy, a Swiss-based company offering distinctive fertility-based services to forward-looking men primed to invest in their futures, today announced that it was declared the winner over 12 other competitors in the Startup Battlefield competition at the TechCrunch Disrupt Berlin 2018. The company is ideally positioned to target a potential $8 billion market in the United States alone.

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Religion: Judaism and Fertility (Part 2 of 3)

The 14 million people globally who identify as belonging to some form of the Jewish faith – Orthodox (10% of followers), Conservative (5%), or Reform (85%) -- are generally encouraged to “be fruitful and multiply”. Broadly speaking, in Judaism if IVF is required, then it is permitted, although the exact process differs by Orthodox, Conservative, and Reform Judaism, and by each Rabbi's point of view.

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Religion: Christianity and Fertility (Part 1 of 3)

How do the largest sects of Christianity view fertility? Most Protestant churches “have more liberal attitudes towards the traditional infertility workup and treatments”, but [sperm and egg] donation is forbidden. In Roman Catholicism, reproductive technology is considered “morally right” if it plays an assisting role in helping marital intercourse achieve its “procreative potential”. And while the Orthodox church can’t support assisted reproduction, it also does not outlaw relying on medical help.

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Kenya: A Falling Birth Rate, Shifting Demographics, and Allocation of Government Resources

Despite a recent pause in fertility rate decline, the East African nation of Kenya recently resumed its downward trend – decreasing from eight to four women per child over the last four decades. And among Sub-Saharan nations, Kenya is far from alone in that regard, although Kenya has the lowest rate of fertility in East Africa.

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Rwanda: 300% population increase by 2050?

While Africa overall has the world’s highest fertility rates, various changes in countries in the Sub-Saharan region of the continent have led to a decline in fertility rates, even though many of those countries report women as having four or more children. Rwanda has experienced a particularly dramatic plunge in fertility rates, with a decline of two children per mother over a period beginning in 2005 and ending in 2014.

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