Posts in Regional
Religion: Christianity and Fertility (Part 1 of 3)

How do the largest sects of Christianity view fertility? Most Protestant churches “have more liberal attitudes towards the traditional infertility workup and treatments”, but [sperm and egg] donation is forbidden. In Roman Catholicism, reproductive technology is considered “morally right” if it plays an assisting role in helping marital intercourse achieve its “procreative potential”. And while the Orthodox church can’t support assisted reproduction, it also does not outlaw relying on medical help.

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Kenya: A Falling Birth Rate, Shifting Demographics, and Allocation of Government Resources

Despite a recent pause in fertility rate decline, the East African nation of Kenya recently resumed its downward trend – decreasing from eight to four women per child over the last four decades. And among Sub-Saharan nations, Kenya is far from alone in that regard, although Kenya has the lowest rate of fertility in East Africa.

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Spain: The “Go-To” Place for Fertility Treatments?

Back in 2006, for instance, Spain passed a law that permitted women above the age of 18, whether single or in same-sex or heterosexual relationships, to receive reproductive care services such as IVF or artificial insemination. Single women or those in same-sex relationships can’t seek such services in France, making Spain an obvious alternative.

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Rwanda: 300% population increase by 2050?

While Africa overall has the world’s highest fertility rates, various changes in countries in the Sub-Saharan region of the continent have led to a decline in fertility rates, even though many of those countries report women as having four or more children. Rwanda has experienced a particularly dramatic plunge in fertility rates, with a decline of two children per mother over a period beginning in 2005 and ending in 2014.

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Egypt: Exploring fertility in a country of 100M

Does a public revolution lead to a private one? Population statistics suggest yes, at least in one country. In Egypt, exactly nine months after the February 2011 Arab Spring, birth rates increased dramatically. Egypt has long been known for its high population growth and fertility rates, and is on the verge of reaching a population of 100M, the highest in the Middle East by a wide margin.

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NY & SF: Parents are waiting till their 30s. And the rest of America?

According to the New York Times, women conceiving for the first time tend to be older in larger cities as well as coastal areas, but younger in less populated areas, including the South and Great Plains: “In New York and San Francisco, their average age is 31 and 32. In Todd County, S.D., and Zapata County, Tex., it’s half a generation earlier, at 20 and 21.”

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